RSS | Archive | Random
hippieflavor at gmail

About

primarily concerned with the conservation of resources, not simply the rearrangement of them.

other interests: corporate sustainability initiatives (and their realizations), popular accessibility of green technology, fighting poverty & social injustice with sustainability.

green feasts

inhabitat
gas 2.0
ecofriend
cleantechnica
freerice
eat local challenge
ecoscraps
best green blogs
local harvest
sustainable table
urbanworkbench
jetson green
green.my.wallet
ecorenovator
green living toolbox
architecture for humanity

latest comments

Brighter Planet's 350 Challenge
16 September 13

apoplecticskeptic:

callurn:

acid-anarchism:

knowledgeandlove:

carlboygenius:

The Ocean Array Plan. Devised by 19yo Boyan Slat, this passive system, if installed, could clean up both The Great Pacific Garbage Patch & The North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Sort of like an anchored Roomba for the ocean…

Source: http://www.trueactivist.com/ingenious-19-year-old-develops-plan-to-clean-up-oceans-in-5-years/

"Although extensive feasibility studies are currently being conducted, it has been estimated that through the selling of plastic retrieved over the five years, the money would surpass the initial cost to execute the project. In other words, it may even be potentially profitable. Because the main deterrent to implement large scale cleanup projects is due to the financial cost, this solution could perhaps pave ways for future innovations of global cleanup to also be invented.”

This is huge.

I approve of this. Hopefully a system can be set up where all profits from this project go back into cleanup efforts

OCEAN ROOMBA

Ocean Roomba FTW.

Reblogged: sds

8 July 13

Reblogged: ninaprettyballerina

Tags: recycling
15 May 13

Turning soda cans into solar heating panels (by anitha goud)

If this could scale, it would be awesome.

2 April 13
"The pressurised steel tank is filled with around 20 litres of nitrogen, plus some hydraulic fluid. Much like a Prius, Hybrid Air vehicles recover energy every time the driver brakes or decelerates. But instead of using this kinetic energy to charge a battery – as electric hybrids do – the Hybrid Air system has a reversible hydraulic pump that compresses the nitrogen in the tank and then unleashes it the next time the driver pumps the accelerator.
"It’s mainly a …" Yarce searches for the word, "a syringe. The nitrogen compresses or decompresses and actually pushes the oil and the hydraulic components to transform this energy into a force that makes the vehicle move forwards. It’s as simple as that.""
(via Peugeot’s Hybrid Air: the car of the future that runs on air | Environment | The Observer)

"The pressurised steel tank is filled with around 20 litres of nitrogen, plus some hydraulic fluid. Much like a Prius, Hybrid Air vehicles recover energy every time the driver brakes or decelerates. But instead of using this kinetic energy to charge a battery – as electric hybrids do – the Hybrid Air system has a reversible hydraulic pump that compresses the nitrogen in the tank and then unleashes it the next time the driver pumps the accelerator.

"It’s mainly a …" Yarce searches for the word, "a syringe. The nitrogen compresses or decompresses and actually pushes the oil and the hydraulic components to transform this energy into a force that makes the vehicle move forwards. It’s as simple as that.""

(via Peugeot’s Hybrid Air: the car of the future that runs on air | Environment | The Observer)

10 December 12

Reblogged: nind-akkiw-deactivated20140215

7 December 12
"The idea of using urban agriculture as the means for revitalizing a community is pretty innovative in and of itself, but activist and developer Mansfield Frazier has plans for a first-ever addition to the vineyards: a biocellar. We mentioned this in passing in the first post, but as the biocellar concept has received more attention recently, I got intrigued by this plan to turn blighted houses into underground greenhouses.

That, essentially, sums up the idea: abandoned houses that are past any hope of renovation are demolished, but the basements are kept intact. With some additional support and a greenhouse-type structure built over the basement, an urban farmer/gardener now has a space that maintains constant temperature appropriate for growing crops… or even maintaining small ecosystems.”

(via Urban Agriculture Moves Undergroud: the Biocellar | Sustainablog)

"The idea of using urban agriculture as the means for revitalizing a community is pretty innovative in and of itself, but activist and developer Mansfield Frazier has plans for a first-ever addition to the vineyards: a biocellar. We mentioned this in passing in the first post, but as the biocellar concept has received more attention recently, I got intrigued by this plan to turn blighted houses into underground greenhouses.

That, essentially, sums up the idea: abandoned houses that are past any hope of renovation are demolished, but the basements are kept intact. With some additional support and a greenhouse-type structure built over the basement, an urban farmer/gardener now has a space that maintains constant temperature appropriate for growing crops… or even maintaining small ecosystems.

(via Urban Agriculture Moves Undergroud: the Biocellar | Sustainablog)

30 November 12

wespeakfortheearth:

Where Does Our Garbage Go?

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have figured out how to track trash. They are doing this to get a better sense of people’s disposal habits, which they hope will improve recycling efforts.

Reblogged: kenobi-wan-obi

18 November 12

Reblogged: kenobi-wan-obi

12 October 12

Reblogged: captainplanit

Tags: recycling
5 October 12
lickystickypickywe:

Some stuff takes a long time, folks…Act wise. We all share this same planet.It’ll come back to haunt you. 

lickystickypickywe:

Some stuff takes a long time, folks…
Act wise. We all share this same planet.
It’ll come back to haunt you. 

(Source: lickystickypickyshe)

Reblogged: totally---unnecessary

29 August 12
Tags: styrofoam
16 August 12

"Short on space but hankering for some fresh vegetables? The $70,000 Agri-Cube might be the answer to your problems. Developed by Japan’s Daiwa House Industry, the parking-space-sized cube can grow leafy greens and root vegetables like turnips and radishes.

The self-contained system comes with a water recycling system and adjustable fluorescent lighting (instead of sunlight) to nourish the plants. Under the right conditions, the cube can grow up to 10,000 heads of lettuce per year—all for approximately 45 cents a vegetable, when electricity costs are taken into account, according DigInfo.

The Agri-Cube’s high price tag gives it limited appeal to the average consumer, but we imagine that restaurants might be big customers, especially since certain restaurants are already experimenting with rooftop hydroponic farming. For restaurants that lack roof access but have a bit of outdoor space, this could be the next best thing.”

(via 1 | A Vegetable-Growing Factory That Fits In A Parking Space | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation)

14 August 12
21 May 12

10 Herbs that Heal

via dancequeen1284

Reblogged: celestiallantern

12 May 12

myampgoesto11:

Garth Britzman(POP)culture

Made from recycled plastic soda bottles

Designer Garth Britzman of Lincoln, Nebraska used recycled bottles filled with colored water to create stunning topographical shade canopy for a vehicle. I love how the natural shape of the plastic bottles makes the pooled water look like leaves. See more over on Behance. (viamy amp goes to 11)”

[via colossal]

Reblogged: myampgoesto11

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh