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About

primarily concerned with the conservation of resources, not simply the rearrangement of them.

other interests: corporate sustainability initiatives (and their realizations), popular accessibility of green technology, fighting poverty & social injustice with sustainability.

green feasts

inhabitat
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best green blogs
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latest comments

Brighter Planet's 350 Challenge
29 July 11

Reblogged:

9 November 10
shiftinconsciousness:

I read an article listing the cleanest fruits and vegetables to buy if you don’t want to buy organic, but don’t want a mouthful of chemicals. It explained how you can stay healthy and save a buck.  The article missed the point…
Buying organic isn’t about ‘me! me! me!’  Buying organic is about protecting farm workers and their families; it’s about keeping chemicals off the land and out of our water; it’s about protecting wildlife; it’s about saving rivers and oceans; it’s about clean rain and air; it’s about dismantling the giant chemical/gmo companies (like Monsanto and Dow ) that are destroying farmers around the world;  it’s about survival of the planet; it’s about the future of food; and it’s about future generations.
Some will complain, “But I can’t afford to buy organic”.  Cesar Chavez (founder of United Farm Workers and one of my heroes because he understood social justice as one interconnected movement) never made over $6000 in a year, never owned a home, and still he made organic and vegan choices.  I asked his granddaughter Julie Chavez Rodriguez how Cesar would respond to “But I can’t afford it”. Without skipping a beat, she replied, “He’d say, ‘You pay for it now, or you pay for it later.’”
Cesar understood that when you buy something you are supporting it, you are subsidizing it, you are saying, “More of the same, and do it in MY name!”
Buying chemical foods is making the worst food the most available food — and it’s killing people, the planet, and animals. It’s setting up a disastrous future (and present!) where real food will be a thing of the past.
This isn’t about ‘you’ or ‘me’… it is about us.  We’re all one.
Can’t afford to buy organic? We can’t afford NOT to.

shiftinconsciousness:

I read an article listing the cleanest fruits and vegetables to buy if you don’t want to buy organic, but don’t want a mouthful of chemicals. It explained how you can stay healthy and save a buck.  The article missed the point…

Buying organic isn’t about ‘me! me! me!’  Buying organic is about protecting farm workers and their families; it’s about keeping chemicals off the land and out of our water; it’s about protecting wildlife; it’s about saving rivers and oceans; it’s about clean rain and air; it’s about dismantling the giant chemical/gmo companies (like Monsanto and Dow ) that are destroying farmers around the world;  it’s about survival of the planet; it’s about the future of food; and it’s about future generations.

Some will complain, “But I can’t afford to buy organic”.  Cesar Chavez (founder of United Farm Workers and one of my heroes because he understood social justice as one interconnected movement) never made over $6000 in a year, never owned a home, and still he made organic and vegan choices.  I asked his granddaughter Julie Chavez Rodriguez how Cesar would respond to “But I can’t afford it”. Without skipping a beat, she replied, “He’d say, ‘You pay for it now, or you pay for it later.’”

Cesar understood that when you buy something you are supporting it, you are subsidizing it, you are saying, “More of the same, and do it in MY name!”

Buying chemical foods is making the worst food the most available food — and it’s killing people, the planet, and animals. It’s setting up a disastrous future (and present!) where real food will be a thing of the past.

This isn’t about ‘you’ or ‘me’… it is about us.  We’re all one.

Can’t afford to buy organic? We can’t afford NOT to.

Reblogged: themattsmith

18 June 10
Put the WeedWhacker and Herbicides Away, Get a Goat | UrbanNeighbourhood.com

"University of Northern British Columbia professor Annie Booth tracked the effectiveness and eating habits of a herd of goats over the span of two years.
"Turns out that goats are incredibly effective in clearing weeds; while any farmer could have told you that this was the case, Booth’s study is the first that actually quantifies the lawn management skills of a heard of goats.
"The University of Washington’s Bothell campus hired a number of goats a few weeks earlier, and is considering acquiring a permanent herd. The University has discovered that, not only are goats cheaper than human labor, but they also provide free fertilizer. The university says that the goats are a way to cut their carbon emissions."

Put the WeedWhacker and Herbicides Away, Get a Goat | UrbanNeighbourhood.com

"University of Northern British Columbia professor Annie Booth tracked the effectiveness and eating habits of a herd of goats over the span of two years.

"Turns out that goats are incredibly effective in clearing weeds; while any farmer could have told you that this was the case, Booth’s study is the first that actually quantifies the lawn management skills of a heard of goats.

"The University of Washington’s Bothell campus hired a number of goats a few weeks earlier, and is considering acquiring a permanent herd. The University has discovered that, not only are goats cheaper than human labor, but they also provide free fertilizer. The university says that the goats are a way to cut their carbon emissions."

22 April 09

Earth Day Home Greening Tip #6 - Choose Nontoxic Products

For your own health and that of your family (pets included) and the environment, use nontoxic products whenever possible. It’s a quick and easy way to keep toxins out of your home, the air, and the water.  Companies such as Seventh Generation offer a wide variety of eco-friendly products. Or you can make your own cleaners using common ingredients — white vinegar and baking soda, for instance.

from Everydayhealth.com

17 April 09
Tags: chemicals
12 March 09

consider hand-washing that “dry clean only” garment

many people don’t know that dry cleaners use a toxic and carcinogenic chemical called perchloroethylene on your clothes. but most garments labeled “dry clean only” can actually be safely hand-washed at home… also saving some green for your pocket.

get some ‘dry clean’ hand-washing tips at care2.com and ktcampbell.com

for clothes you just can’t wash at home, find a “wet cleaner”, or CO2 dry cleaner, in your area. there is a nationwide list at www.epa.gov

perchloroethylene fact sheet

28 January 09
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh