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About

primarily concerned with the conservation of resources, not simply the rearrangement of them.

other interests: corporate sustainability initiatives (and their realizations), popular accessibility of green technology, fighting poverty & social injustice with sustainability.

green feasts

inhabitat
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latest comments

Brighter Planet's 350 Challenge
4 August 09

"The Sage" Sets LEED Platinum Record » jetsongreen

My friend works for Arborsouth Architecture and they just completed this residence in Eugene, which has received the highest LEED certification of any home in the state of Oregon, and which I had the priviledge to tour last week.

The house has:

  • Advanced double 2x4 framed walls w/ foam insulation
  • Active solar water heating and solar photovoltaics
  • Heat recovery ventilator and Energy Star appliances
  • Drought resistant landscaping and rainwater collection
  • Efficient low-flow faucets and dual-flush toilets
  • Reclaimed lumber flooring and recycled cork floors
  • Accent siding reclaimed from Cuthbert Amphitheater
  • Zero VOC paints throughout the house

It is a beautiful home, and a prime example of how environmental-friendliness does not have to reduce liveability.

You can also read about the home at SW Oregon Architect.

photos copyright Mike Dean Photography

4 February 09
tlow:

Dezeen » Blog Archive » Olisur olive oil factory by GH + A Architects
Santiago studio Guillermo Hevia Architects have completed a factory for olive oil manufacturers Olisur, located 200 km south of Santiago in Chile.
The building comprises the company offices and factory, and is made of concrete clad in wood and glass. The factory uses geothermic energy, natural lighting and natural ventilation. According to the architects, all materials used in production of the oil are biodegradable.
-More beautiful pictures, worth clicking.



i love this full-sized garage door:

"Geothermic instead of central heating and air conditioning for the production areas and the oil barrels area, ventilated façades system in the building, passive energies to allow air to come into and go out the different areas of the offices and services (cross ventilation in the ceiling)."

"Evaporation from the water mirror located in the front of the office building and cone studies of shade and sun direction to determine the eaves necessary for the different seasons."

tlow:

Dezeen » Blog Archive » Olisur olive oil factory by GH + A Architects


Santiago studio Guillermo Hevia Architects have completed a factory for olive oil manufacturers Olisur, located 200 km south of Santiago in Chile.

The building comprises the company offices and factory, and is made of concrete clad in wood and glass. The factory uses geothermic energy, natural lighting and natural ventilation. According to the architects, all materials used in production of the oil are biodegradable.

-More beautiful pictures, worth clicking.

i love this full-sized garage door:

"Geothermic instead of central heating and air conditioning for the production areas and the oil barrels area, ventilated façades system in the building, passive energies to allow air to come into and go out the different areas of the offices and services (cross ventilation in the ceiling)."

olisur-olive-oil-factory-by-gh-a-architects-15.jpg

"Evaporation from the water mirror located in the front of the office building and cone studies of shade and sun direction to determine the eaves necessary for the different seasons."

Reblogged: tlow

30 January 09
26 January 09
A composite image splits Manhattan into two visions; how it looked in 1609, left; its more vertical profile today, right. Markley Boyer/The Mannahatta Project

via blakeley
A composite image splits Manhattan into two visions; how it looked in 1609, left; its more vertical profile today, right. Markley Boyer/The Mannahatta Project

via blakeley

Reblogged: blakeley

19 January 09
tanya77:

unicornology:

missmodular:
“London architects dRMM have designed a house with mobile walls and roof that can be moved to cover and uncover parts of the dwelling” - dezeen.

Sick.

tanya77:

unicornology:

missmodular:

“London architects dRMM have designed a house with mobile walls and roof that can be moved to cover and uncover parts of the dwelling” - dezeen.

Sick.

Reblogged: tanya77

19 January 09
sarabethhayden:

$5,000 Paper House is the World’s Swankiest Hobo Pad
Taking playing with paper to the next level.
(via Gizmodo)

this gives new meaning to the phrase, “paper-thin walls.”

sarabethhayden:

$5,000 Paper House is the World’s Swankiest Hobo Pad

Taking playing with paper to the next level.

(via Gizmodo)

this gives new meaning to the phrase, “paper-thin walls.”

Reblogged: everydaymarvels-deactivated2012

16 January 09
Inhabitat » Passive Houses Heating Up Around the World - i would move into that house today if i could.

Inhabitat » Passive Houses Heating Up Around the World - i would move into that house today if i could.

15 January 09
6 January 09
"The Hurriquake, designed by Bostitch engineer Ed Sutt, is a study in practical world-changing innovation: it combines simple building technologies like threading and a spiral shank, placed at exactly the right points along the nail so that it anchors deeply into wood, holding steady where it needs to most, and creates wobble-free joints at the points where wood planks are most likely to begin to weaken. 

According to Next Big Future, the nails (which fit into a modern nail gun), “add $15 to the price of a home and make a house 50% more resistant to a hurricane or strong winds (or over pressures from a nuke).”” (via Worldchanging: Passive Survivability Revisited: The Hurriquake Nail)

"The Hurriquake, designed by Bostitch engineer Ed Sutt, is a study in practical world-changing innovation: it combines simple building technologies like threading and a spiral shank, placed at exactly the right points along the nail so that it anchors deeply into wood, holding steady where it needs to most, and creates wobble-free joints at the points where wood planks are most likely to begin to weaken.

According to Next Big Future, the nails (which fit into a modern nail gun), “add $15 to the price of a home and make a house 50% more resistant to a hurricane or strong winds (or over pressures from a nuke).”” (via Worldchanging: Passive Survivability Revisited: The Hurriquake Nail)

17 December 08
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh