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primarily concerned with the conservation of resources, not simply the rearrangement of them.

other interests: corporate sustainability initiatives (and their realizations), popular accessibility of green technology, fighting poverty & social injustice with sustainability.

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Brighter Planet's 350 Challenge
8 December 11

Green Holiday Tips

ecofriendlyhealth:

Make Your Own Wrapping Paper

Most mass-produced wrapping paper you find in stores is not recyclable and ends up in landfills. Instead, here’s a great chance to get creative! Wrap presents with old maps, the comics section ofa newspaper, or children’s artwork. Or use a scarf, attractive dish towel, bandana, or some other useful cloth item. If every family wrapped just three gifts this way, it would save enough paper to cover 45,000 football fields.

Buy Energy-Saving Holiday Lights

Now you can decorate your house with LED lights that use 90 percent less energy than conventional holiday lights, and can save your family up to $50 on your energy bills during the holiday season! LED lights are available at many major retailers, including Target, CostCo, and Ace Hardware.

Add Organic and Local Foods to Your Holiday Feast

Support local family farmers who grow sustainable meat and produce. Not only does it taste better, you’ll be doing your part for the planet too. Looking for an organic turkey or ham for Christmas dinner? Find out where to get local green products in your neighborhood.

Get a Pesticide-Free Tree

Demand is on the rise for Christmas trees that are not covered in chemicals; some growers use 40 different pesticides, as well as chemical colorants. The good news is that there are now a number of tree-farms that sell pesticide-free trees, so ask your local Christmas tree seller, or search for an organic tree farm near you.

Recycle Your Christmas Tree

Ninety-eight percent of Christmas trees were grown on farms, not in forests, so at least it’s not as if you’re cutting down an ancient tree. Each year, 10 million Christmas trees end up in the landfill. While your tree won’t fit in the recycling bin with your newspapers and bottles, you can recycle your tree: many cities offer programs to turn your tree to mulch or wood chips. Call (800) CLEANUP or visit  www.earth911.org to find the tree-recycling program near you.

Recycle Your Old Cellphone

Getting a new cell phone for Christmas? Not sure what to do with the old one? Now, you can drop off that old phone at any Staples store, as part of the Sierra Club cell phone recycling program. Each year, 130 million cell phones are thrown out, weighing approximately 65,000 tons. Recycling your old phone prevents hazardous elements like mercury, cadmium and lead from ending up in our landfills. Find out more.

Reblogged: msmajik

18 December 08
What Happens to the 72’ tall Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree After the Holidays? “It will be donated to Habitat for Humanity to furnish wood for some of the Americus, Ga.–based nonprofit organization’s house-building projects next year.” (via Scientific American)

What Happens to the 72’ tall Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree After the Holidays? “It will be donated to Habitat for Humanity to furnish wood for some of the Americus, Ga.–based nonprofit organization’s house-building projects next year.” (via Scientific American)

11 December 08
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh